South African Swimming Championships 

2016 - Durban

  MEN    
50 Brad Tandy (N) Douglas Erasmus (NT) Roland Schoeman (NTS
100 Calvyn Justus (N) Myles Brown (N) Douglas Erasmus (NT)
200 Chad le Clos (N) Myles Brown (N) Marwan Elkamash (Egypt)
400 Myles Brown (N) Marwan Elkamash (Egypt) Brent Szurdoki (CG)
800 Luke Erwee (N) Philip Seidler (Namibia) Roberto Gomes (CG)
1500 Matthew Meyer (N) Brent Szurdoki (CG) Josh Dannhauser (N)
Back      
50 Ricky Ellis (CG) Jacques van Zyl (NT) Christopher Reis (EP)
100 Christopher Reid (EP)  NR Jacques van Zyl (NT) Ricky Ellis (CG)
200 Martin Binedell (N) Neil Fair (NT) Ricky Ellis (CG)
Breast      
50 Cameron van den Burgh (NT) Guilio Zorzi (NT) Jarred Crous (NT)
100 Cameron van den Burgh (NT) Jarred Crous (NT) Craig Emslie (WP)
200 Cameron van den Burgh (NT) Jarred Crous (NT) Ayrton Sweeny (N)
Fly      
50 Brett Walsh (N) Rynard Wessels (OFS) Nico Meyer (CG)
100 Chad le Clos (N) Dylan Bosch (CG) Ryan Coetzee (NT)
200 Chad le Clos (N) Sebastien Rousseau (N) Dylan Bosch (CG)
IM      
200 Dylan Bosch (CG) Michael Meyer (CG) Jarryd Baxter (CG)
400 Sebastian Rousseau (N) Michael Meyer (CG) Ayrton Sweeney (N)
       
200 Freestyle relay Natal Eastern Province Northern Tigers (Pretoria)
400 Freestyle relay Northern Tigers (Pretoria - NT) Natal (N) Eastern Province (EP)
800 Freestyle relay       
400 Medley relay Northern Tigers (Pretoria - NT) CG Eastern Province (EP)
       
       
  WOMEN    
50 Tayla Lovemore (N) Jessica Ashley-Cooper (WP) Emma Chelius (WP)
100 Erin Gallagher (N) Karin Prinsloo (NT) Tayla Lovemore (N)
200 Karin Prinsloo (NT) Kristin Bellingham (N) Caitlin Kat (WP)
400 Caitlyn Kat (WP) Kristin Bellingham (N) Kate Beavon (CG)
800 Michelle Weber (N) Jessica Whelan (CG) Kristin Bellingham (N)
1500 Tamsin Tennant (N) Carli Antonopoulos (WP0 Charlise Oberholzer (N)
Back      
50 Carissa van Rooyen (CG) Gabi Grobler (CG) Catherine Sainsbury (N)
100 Mariella Venter (CG) Nathania van Niekerk (CG) Jessica Ashley-Cooper (WP)
200 Nathania van Niekerk (CG) Mariella Venter (CG) Samantha Randle (NT)
Breast      
50 Tara Nicholas (N) Taryn McKenzie (CG) Tatjana Schoenmaker (NT)
100 Tatjana Schoenmaker (NT) Franko Jonker (NT) Tara Nicholas (N)
200 Tatjana Schoenmaker (NT) Kaylene Corbett (EP) Franko Jonker (NT)
Fly      
50 Vanessa Mohr (NT) Felicity Passon (Seychelles) Hannah McLean-Leonard (N)
100 Marne Erasmus (B) Vanessa Mohr (NT) Rene Warnes (N)
200 René Warnes (N) Marli Jacobs (WP) Tarryn Els (EP)
IM      
200 Marlies Ross (NT) Gabi Grobler (CG) Kristy Mc Lauchlan (CG)
400 Marlies Ross (NT) Kirsty Mc Lauchlan (CG) Rebecca Meder (WP)
       
200 Freestyle relay Natal  Western Province Northern Tigers (Pretoria)
400 Freestyle relay Natal  Western Province Natal B
800 Freestyle relay  Western Province CG Natal 

Combined Team Scores -  1. KwaZulu Natal 1047.5 2. Central Gauteng Aquatics 832.5 3. Northern Tigers Swimming 824 4. Western Province Aquatics 635 5. Nelson Mandela Bay Aquatics 184 6. Free State 129 7. Buffalo City Aquatics 66 8. North West Swimming 38 9. Mpumalanga 33 10. Seychelles Swimming 24 11. Egyptian Swimming Federation 20 12. Limpopo Province 14 13. Eastern Gauteng Aquatics 13 14. Swimming Namibia 9

Myles Brown

Special thanks to Wayne Riddin for contributing to this report.

Sebastien Rousseau and Michael Meyer set the tone on the first night of the South African National Championship finals with two Olympic qualifying times at the South African Swimming Championships at the Kings Park pool in Durban this evening.

MEN’S 400 IM- FINAL

Olympic Qualifying Time: 4:16.71

  1. Sebastien Rousseau: 4:14.75*
  2. Michael Meyer: 4:15.71*
  3. Ayrton Sweeney: 4:24.48

Sebastien Rousseau (25) lead the challenge out on the men’s 400 individual medley ahead of Michael Meyer (23) in 57.05, but the extra work in preparation from Meyer certainly paid off as he took the lead marginally from Rousseau after the backstroke and breaststroke legs.

Rousseau, a two-time Olympian, had to work hard to get ahead of the tenacious Meyer, and the extra competition was the best medicine as Rousseau raced to a 4:14.75 with Meyer touching in 4:15.71 – opening their championships with a relieving qualifying time each.

While Rousseau was “extremely happy to have got a qualifying time on day one”, it was an elated Meyer who was more than smiling, as in 2012 he hit the qualifying time, only to finish third and be left at home.

“I have not been faster than 2012, so I am very happy that it all came together this time.” he said. “I have worked hard on my backstroke and breaststroke, and when I was that close to Sebastien, I knew I had a good chance. I am so happy!”

WOMEN’S 100 FLY- SEMIFINALS

Olympic Qualifying Time: 58.74

  1. Marne Erasmus: 1:00.16
  2. Vanessa Mohr: 1:00.71
  3. Jessica Ashley-Cooper: 1:01.11
  4. Rene’ Warnes: 1:01.67
  5. Felicity Passon: 1:01.74
  6. Tayla Lovemore: 1:01.84
  7. Hanna McLean-Leonard: 1:03.87
  8. Dune Coetzee: 1:03.94

In the women’s 100m butterfly, both heat winners went slower than their prelims swims, as Vanessa Mohr (21) was 0.41 behind with a 1:00.71 and Marne Erasmus (20) just 0.20 slower in 1:00.16. They were the only swimmers under 1:01, but both swimmers will need to improve on their finish if they hope to beat the 58.74 mark.

Jessica Ashley-Cooper (1:01.11), Rene’ Warnes (1:01.67), Felicity Passon (1:01.74), and Tayla Lovemore (1:01.84) also came in under the 1:02 mark.

Hanna McLean-Leonard and Dune Coetzee also made the championship final in 1:03.87 and 1:03.94.

MEN’S 400 FREE- FINAL

Olympic Qualifying Time: 3:50.40 

  1. Myles Brown: 3:48.86*
  2. Marwan Elkamash: 3:48:93
  3. Brent Szurdoki: 3:52.34

Myles Brown (23) and Marwan Elkamash (22) from Egypt had the closest of races in the men’s 400 freestyle to both drop below the 3:50.44 Olympic time. Elkamash was brave to lead out just on 1:52 at the halfway mark with Brown happy to follow closely until the final 50m where he then started his main challenge only to see them separated by just .07, Brown clocking 3:48.86 to become the fourth male to qualify on day one.

Both Jarryd Baxter and Matthew Meyer both finished in under 4:00, swimming 3:55.44 and 3:56.07, respectively.

WOMEN’S 400 IM- FINAL

Olympic Qualifying Time: 4:43.46

  1. Marlies Ross: 4:50.26
  2. Kirsty McLauchlan: 4:53.98
  3. Rebecca Meder: 4:57.06

Marlies Ross (18) found it tough going in the women’s 400m IM as she ended way off the 4:43.46 mark. Ross only recently joined up with Bob Bowman in Arizona from January but ended on a 4:50.26 followed by Kirsty McLaughlan (22) in 4:53.98 and young 13-year-old Rebecca Meder next in 4:57.06.

Jessican Whelan and Samantha Randle came in under five minutes with 4:58.44 and 4:58.91.

MEN’S 100 BREAST- SEMIFINALS

  1. Cameron van der Burgh: 59.69*
  2. Jarred Crous: 1:00.88
  3. Craig Emslie: 1:02.30
  4. Giulio Zorzi: 1:02.54
  5. Alaric Basson: 1:03.05
  6. Ayrton Sweeney: 1:03.57
  7. Jared Pike: 1:03.61
  8. Duncan Rudolph: 1:04.01

It was left to Cameron van der Burgh (27) again in the second semifinal of the men’s 100m breaststroke to entertain the crowd with his second Olympic qualifying time on the opening day. After the morning heat he “was happy with breaking 60sec and was aiming at a lower 59 in the semi.”

This is exactly what the Olympic champion did – out fast in 27.92sec with 19 strokes and ending on a 59.69sec. However, in the morning he was out on 16 strokes in 28.53sec – and hopefully a lesson learned!

In the first semifinal, a determined Jarred Crous (19) perhaps also made the mistake of pushing out too hard in the first length in 28.21, returning just 0.31 outside the Olympic mark with a 1:00.88. Craig Emslie (20) took the third seed in 1:02.30.

The possibility of two men under 60 seconds in the final will certainly lift the crowd off their feet!

PARALYMPIC EVENTS

The Paralympic swimmers were also getting their qualifying times done with the exciting Kevin Paul racing to a 2:15.78 for the men’s 200m IM in the SM14 class, well under the 2:17.02 mark. Alani Ferreira was also comfortably under the 2:52.27 time for her SM13 class with a 2:50.43 – also a new African record.

Le Clos joins growing number headed for Rio

by ZwemZa on April 12th, 2016

chad le clos dubai 31

The second evening of the South African Swimming Championships saw just three Olympic qualifying times and four Paralympic qualifying times as the nerves got the better of a few swimmers in Durban tonight.

Women’s 100m backstroke
Mariella Venter (16) looked the only one to threaten the Olympic QT of 1:00,25 as she took the top position with a solid 1:00,97. Jessica Ashley-Cooper (23) gave her enough opposition on the first 50m of the second semi-final to clock 1:02,36 while Nathania van Niekerk (17) was an easy winner of the first semi to take the 3rd spot into the final in 1:02,69.

Men’s 200m Freestyle
Both semi-finals produced encouraging performances with Egyptian Marwan Elkamash (22) setting the pace with a 1:48,66 followed closely by Calvyn Justus (20) in 1:49,68 and young Jaryd Baxter (17) third in 1:50,22. But the second semi saw a duel between Olympic star Chad le Clos (23) and training partner Myles Brown (23) – Le Clos taking the final few metres in his first qualifying time of 1:47,88 while Brown was just out-touched in 1:48,05.
Brown qualified in the 400m freestyle yesterday as well as the charging Sebastien Rousseau (25) in the 400m IM – Rousseau clocking the fourth-fastest time with a 1:48,80. The final tomorrow could see more action.

Women’s 100m Butterfly

Marne Erasmus (20) gave her best shot at the QT of 58,74sec as she took it out in 28,31sec at the 50m mark and edged ahead of Vanessa Mohr (21) in the 100m butterfly. But the final time of 59,92sec for Erasmus fell well short as well as second-placed Mohr on 1:00,34. Rene Warnes (24) stole the bronze in 1:01,48 ahead of Seychelles Felicity Passon in 1:01,52.

Men’s 100m Breaststroke
Olympic champion Cameron van der Burgh (27) remained consistent in his favoured event racing out in 27,90sec with 18 strokes and although picking up the tempo managed to clock a fraction faster with a 59,66sec dash while the younger Jarred Crous (19) perhaps chased too hard on the first 50m to end on a 1:01,10 to miss the QT of 1:00,57.  Craig Emslie (20) stole the minor placing by 0,04sec from Giulio Zorzi (27) with a 1:02,33.

Women’s 100m Breaststroke
SMU’s Tara Nicholas was 0,20sec slower than her heats time with a 1:08,68 in the first semi-final – and the duel between Tatjana Schoenmaker and Texas A&M’s Franko Joncker in 1:08,72 and 1:08,79 respectively in the second semi will result in a huge battle for the Olympic QT of 1:07,85 tomorrow. Schoenmaker has already done the 200m breaststroke QT a month earlier in 2:26,05.

Men’s 100m Backstroke:
Chris Reid took the first 50m out a fraction faster in 25,83sec and was “happy with being consistently up with the top backstrokers in the world!” He was marginally slower than his morning swim where he set his first Olympic QT of 53,12sec and break the African and South African record of 53,75sec held by Gerhard Zandberg. The semi-final time of 53,23sec still had the crowd on their feet and a faster final could still be on the cards.

Women’s 400m Freestyle
Caitlin Kat (23) took the closely contested race by 0,19sec from a hard chasing Kristin Bellingan (18) with a slower than expected 4:20,18.

Paralympic Qualifiers:
Alani Ferriera dropped her 1:29,50 QT in the morning down to 1:26,90 for the SB13 100m breaststroke to make it three events achieved so far. Earlier Kevin Paul was just 1,08 sec outside the world record in the SB9 100m breaststroke with his fastest time at the meet so far in 1:05,10. He also pulled Johann van Heerden to another QT in 1:12,64 – but it was an excited Craig Groenewald who achieved his first QT in the SB14 category in 1:12,33.

Wayne Riddin

No fireworks on penultimate day

relay

by ZwemZa on April 16th, 2016

Olympians Chad le Clos and Cameron van der Burgh were again in the mix of fortunes to lift an otherwise disappointing penultimate evening of finals at the South African Swimming Championships at the Kings Park pool in Durban this evening.

Together with Chris Reid and Calvyn Justus, the crowd reached a higher gear as the South African men’s 4 x 100m medley relay team took to the water in an attempt to qualify for the Olympic Games. This happened after some near misses from the semi-finals of the men’s 50m freestyle and the women’s 200m breaststroke that got the evening off to a gloomy start.

Men’s 50m Freestyle Semi-Final
The men’s 50m Freestyle semi-finals failed to produce another Olympic QT as Douglas Erasmus started the charge with a 22,40 in the first semi. He was chased home by Reynard Wessels in 22,98 before the second semi featuring the seasoned Roland Schoeman up against Brad Tandy. It was not to be as the pressure perhaps got the better of the sprinters with Tandy racing to a 22,28 and Schoeman on 22,69. Brett Walsh ended on 22,98 to share the 4th place with Wessels and the only men under 23 seconds.

Women’s 200m Breaststroke Final
It was all Tatjana Schoenmaker from the start aiming at that 2:26,94 mark she had achieved just over a month ago in the 200m breaststroke. Schoenmaker took it out on a 1:11,52 and certainly looked a little easier than the semi-final. Kaylene Corbett was chasing her with Franko Joncker trailing off the pace, but the disappointment all fell down to the final time from Schoenmaker as she missed the mark by just 0,01sec in 2:26,95.
Corbett did well to take the silver in 2:30,18 while Joncker was also disappointing in her 2:31,29 after posting 2:28’s in the first two swims.

Men’s 4 x 100 Medley Relay Time Trial
What an amazing performance from the four Olympic hopefuls as it brought the crowd to their feet – Christopher Read opting out the men’s 200m backstroke to lead off this relay with an outstanding 53,52 before Cameron van der Burgh took over in the breaststroke to split an encouraging 58,95 and handed over to Chad le Clos for the butterfly leg. Le Clos kept the pace going with a quick 51,59 to hand over to the younger Calvyn Justus in the freestyle – the man who won last night only to find out he had to fill this berth. Justus served his place with an excellent 49,74 to finish under the time required of 3:34,70 with a 3:33,80.

Men’s 200m Backstroke Final
Without Chris Read in the field it was left up to Martin Binedell to race Neil Fair and Ricky Ellis, all three turning close to 59 seconds before the stronger finishing Binedell left his challengers behind to win in 2:01,35. The race for second went to Fair on 2:02,40 with the veteran Ellis third in 2:02,72.

Women’s 200m Backstroke Semi-Final
Mariella Venter started off the first semi-final in an easy looking 2:13 without anyone to push her while Nathania van Niekerk seemed set to see how close she could get to the 2:10,60 Olympic mark. Van Niekerk was out in 1:04 and returned in an encouraging 2:11,53 – the final with these two will be the last bit of hope for the South African women to clock up individual qualifying times. Perhaps on the last day something good can come out for the ladies.

Men’s 200m IM Final
Dylan Bosch made a great effort to chase the 2:00,28 Olympic time in the 200m IM together with Michael Meyer. During the backstroke leg a bank of lights went out but Bosch “did not feel it affected him” as he raced home in 2:01,24 next to a chasing Meyer who clocked 2:01,69. The youngest man in the field, Jarryd Baxter (17) finished in a deserving 2:03,21.

Women’s 100m Freestyle Final
A determined Erin Gallagher took the race to her opposition in the 100m freestyle as she raced out on 26,38 but found it tough going on the way home as Karin Prinsloo managed to finish stronger and take the victory in 56,12 to her 56,31. Tayla Lovemore improved further to take the bronze in a personal best 56,98.

Men’s 100m Butterfly Semi-Final
It was again the versatile Dylan Bosch who set the pace in the first semi-final shortly after his 200m IM victory. Bosch surged near the end to clock 54,04 but it was the semi-final to follow that featured Olympic star Chad Le Clos – and he never seems to disappoint with yet another QT and racing to a 51,91 despite his earlier effort split of 51,59 in the relay time trial. Ryan Coetzee ended marginally faster next to Le Clos in 53,44 to take the second spot for the final.

Paralympic swimmer Adri Visser (S5) was slightly off her morning heat time but still posted a QT of 52,02 in the 50m butterfly while Hendri Herbst (S11) also was off his morning time but a 27,24 for the 50m freestyle still way under the QT.

Olympic Qualifying Times following Day 06:

  • Sebastien Rousseau – 400m individual medley – 4:14.75
  • Michael Meyer – 400m individual medley – 4:15.71
  • Myles Brown – 400m freestyle – 3:48.86
  • Cameron van der Burgh – 100m breaststroke – 59.66
  • Christopher Reid – 100m backstroke – 53.13
  • Chad le Clos – 200m freestyle – 1:47.75
  • Chad le Clos – 200m butterfly  – 1:55,04
  • Cameron van der Burgh – 200m breaststroke – 2:10,13
  • Jarred Crous – 200m breaststroke – 2:11,65
  • Brad Tandy – 50m freestyle – 22,13
  • Douglas Erasmus – 50m freestyle – 22,26
  • Chad le Clos – 100m butterfly – 51,81

Paralympic Qualifying Times following Day 06:

  • Kevin Paul (SM10) – 200m individual medley – 2:15.78
  • Kevin Paul (SB9) – 100m breaststroke – 1:05.10
  • Johann van Heerden (SB9) – 100m breaststroke – 1:12.64
  • Alani Ferreira (SM13) – 200m individual medley – 2:50.43
  • Alani Ferreira (S13) – 400m freestyle – 5:21.00 (heats)
  • Alani Ferreira (SB13) – 100m breaststroke – 1:26.90
  • Emily Gray (S9) – 400m freestyle – 5:05.36 (heats)
  • Emily Gray (S10) – 100m backstroke – 1:17.17
  • Craig Groenewald (SB14) – 100m breaststroke – 1:12.33
  • Hendri Herbst (S11) – 100m backstroke – 1:16.84
  • Shireen Sapiro (S10) – 100m backstroke – 1:11.87
  • Achmat Hassiem (S10) – 100m butterfly – 1:00,44
  • Alani Ferreira (S13) – 100m butterfly – 1:23,37
  • Beth Nothling (S5) – 50m backstroke – 54,47
  • Hendri Herbst (S11) – 100m freestyle – 1:00,01
  • Hendri Herbst (S11) – 50m freestyle – 27,12
  • Adri Visser (S5) – 50m butterfly – 51,6

Wayne Riddin

 

Le Clos and van der Burgh make times, rising star Reid impresses 

14 Apr 2016

OLYMPIC champions Chad le Clos and Cameron van der Burgh have swum qualifying times for the Rio de J Janeiro Olympic Games, while Chris Reid’s star has been on the rise.

On his birthday, Le Clos predictably excelled at the South African Swimming Championships, twice recording qualifying times in the 200 m freestyle and the 200 m buttery. In the freestyle, after a great battle with Myles Brown, he edged out his training partner, who had won the event last year, with a time of 1:47,75 to Brown’s 1:48,29. Then, in his favoured 200 m buttery, Le Clos went an encouraging 1:55,61 and helped pull Sebastien Rousseau within 0,63 of the qualifying standard, with a time of 1:5 6,97. “I died a little on the last 15 metres,” Le Clos admit ted after his seminal win, “but I was not really aiming at a time, so I am happy,” Reid claimed the 100m backstroke title, swimming below the Rio qualifying mark for a third successive time. Two of his swims bettered Gerhard Zandberg’s South African record of 5 3,75 seconds, with his best of 53,12 lopping a sizeable 0,63 o the old mark. Pietermaritzburg Seals swimming coach Wayne Riddin, an assistant coach at the 2012 London Olympics and head coach of the South African team at the Sydney Ol Olympics, said R eid had improved markedly since heading to the U.S. to study at the University of Alabama. “He’s gone there, got strong, and done the training to mix it at this level. He has shone, ” Riddin said. The wedge, which backstroke swimmers now use to start their races and prevent them from slipping down the wall, should allow Reid to break the 53second barrier, Riddin reckoned. With Le Clos and Van der Burgh the reigning Olympic champions in the buttery and breaststroke respectively, and Reid a potential medal contender in the backstroke, Team South Africa are on course to put a very exciting medley relay lineup together.

The big question is who the fourth member of the lineup will be. Riddin said it wouldn’t be a surprise if that man is Roland Schoeman, who is aiming for a place at a the Olympics. Schoeman was a member of the Awesome Foursome who won freestyle relay gold in Athens in 2004 and will have turned 36 by the time the Olympics come around, but he remains a top competitor. Alani Ferreira, who has recorded three Rio Paralympic qualifying marks in Durban, trains under Riddin. He declared himself satisfied with her performances, especially since she has been dealing with a rotator cuff injury for the past six months, which has allowed her to do very little backstroke. “When you look at the balance of coping with an injury and school requirements, we could have been a bit faster, but we have come out on top by swimming three qualifying times. Hopefully, we will get another one in the 100m buttery,” he said. “Looking at a possible medal in Rio, she is going to have to up her game a little bit over the cycle that you now train into the Paralympics. “I just hope all parties come together to allow her the opportunity to go further.”

Jarred Crous 2016

Huge dreams for a huge talent

By Ockert de Villiers  Apr 22, 2016

Johannesburg - Jarred Crous would one day like to be the best in the world like Cameron van der Burgh has been for so many years.

The teenage breaststroker made the first step towards realising his dream when he qualified for the Rio Olympic Games at last week’s South African Swimming Championships in Durban.

Finishing behind Van der Burgh in the 200m breaststroke, the 19-year-old Crous posted a time of 2:11.65 to take four seconds off his previous best time to earn a place to his maiden Games.

”Now the hard work really begins to ensure I can actually compete and not just participate at the Olympics because you want to compete against the best in the world,” Crous said.

”The goal is to become the best one day, so I will have to start working on that now.”The former Crawford College pupil represented South Africa at the 2014 Nanjing Youth Olympics where he featured in the finals of the 50, 100, and 200m breaststroke.

 

Crous’ reason for getting into the pool is the same as Van der Burgh’s as their diagnoses for ADHD led them to swimming as alternative treatment to medication.

They also matriculated from the same school, and will both be swimming the same events in Rio de Janeiro in August.While Van der Burgh will be going into the Games as the defending champion in the 100m breaststroke and as serious medal prospect, Crous will be using his debut on the global stage as a stepping stone to future glory.

”The build-up to 2016 started last year September when I moved to Igor Omelchenko, and he said ‘we can make it if we put in all the effort’ but he couldn’t guarantee it, no-one can,” Crous said.

 

”It is going to be building blocks towards 2020 and 2024 going to my first major international gala and you can’t go much bigger than the Olympic Games.”This one will be more about getting the experience, taking in the vibe, and trying to make semi-finals and do personal best times while I am there.

”Crous’ qualifying swim provided one of the most poignant moments of last week’s championships as his father Juan Crous celebrated his son’s feat.

”You f…king champion!” Juan exclaimed as he hugged his son before they shared in an emotional embrace.Qualifying for the pinnacle of his sport, Crous talked about the personal sacrifices his parents had to make to aid him in reaching his dreams.

”When I won my first gold in 2005 my dad asked me what I wanted to do from there and I said I wanted to swim at the Olympics one day,” Crous recalled.

”My parents promised to do anything in their powers to get me there and they’ve done pretty much everything for me, the sacrifices have been huge, when we had no money they would support me no matter what.”

The Star

relay 1

Cameron, Chad, Christopher and Calvyn

Doing relay Justus Saturday Star 

16 Apr 2016 · OCKERT VILLIERS

Set a target of 3min 34sec to qualify for the 4x100m medley relay team, the four swimmers dipped narrowly as Justus, swimming the freestyle leg, stopped the clock on 3:33.80. Reid, who broke the South African 100m backstroke record earlier this week, got the team o to a good start with a split of 53.12 seconds. Van der Burgh was the star of the relay in the breaststroke leg, clocking 58.95sec before Le Clos posted 51.59 in the buttery. At the final takeover, Justus had to dip below 50 seconds to give the team a chance of qualifying but the 20-year-old held his nerve with a split of 49.74. An excited Van der Burgh said he believed the team had the potential to compete for a medal at the Games but it would require some blood, sweat, and tears to get there. “The main thing is we’ve qualified, it is a huge thing for us,” Van der Burgh said. “I believe it is our most competitive relay going into the Olympic Games. “We’ve got a lot of hard work but we have four months to feed o each other, work hard and work on those takeovers, get the splits down and understand where we need to improve.” Reid’s record-breaking swim during the 100m backstroke heats earlier this week set the relay plans into motion as South Africa finally found a backstroker to complement world-beating stars van der Burgh and Le Clos.

“The head coach (Graham Hill) approached me two years ago and said we have the potential to have a really good relay team if a backstroker made the step-up and go 53-middle,” Reid said. “That has been the goal for me over the last two years, not only to qualify but get the 53 and make the relay possible. “I think it would be great for our country if we pull o another relay win or at least a medal like the boys in Athens.” This just left the team to nd a freestyle swimmer to round o the team, and thanks to his title-winning swim in the 100m freestyle, Justus was selected to ll the high-pressure final leg of the relay. Justus demonstrated big match temperament in the final with a new personal best 49.88 to dip below 50 seconds the first time in his young career. “It is safe to say that was the most terrified I’ve ever been but when I heard the crowd going o for Chris when he got in, it went away and I was so excited,” Justus said. “It’s been my dream since I started the sport so I am on cloud nine right now.”

 

Myles Brown 1

Olympic swim dream comes true

Valene Govender  28 Apr 2016

AFTER the disappointment of missing out on the London Olympic Games four years ago, the elation of qualifying for the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro has outweighed the disappointment for Elite Athlete Development Programme swimming star Myles Brown, who will represent South Africa at the world showpiece in August.

With one chance to qualify at the recent South African Swimming Championships, Brown knew he had the ability to be on the South African team, however, getting through the qualification process was the biggest challenge in his 400m freestyle bid.

“It’s a massive relief that I have finally qualified,” said the former Kearsney College pupil.

“It is up there with one of the biggest moments of my career.

“I just missed out on the London Games so it’s an awesome feeling knowing that I am going to be going to the Olympic Games this year.”

Despite the fact that qualification is in the bag, Brown and the rest of the South African swimming team have got a number of events and pre-Olympic camps to attend and so he realises there is no time to rest on his laurels.

“The year started with trying to get into the best shape possible for the qualifiers, but now the real hard work starts for me and the rest of the team.

“I have to start stepping it up now and get prepared to race overseas in the build-up to Rio as we leave South Africa on 19 May for a long period of preparation, starting with a two-week stay in Doha followed by the Mare Nostrum Series,” said Brown.

His preparations for the Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games finish in the host nation following more competitive swimming in the western hemisphere.

“We will be swimming in a few galas in Fort Lauderdale in the United States before we jet off for Brazil where we will be preparing just outside Rio.

 

“This will probably be the most important preparation for us as we will be acclimatising as well as getting over any jetlag that we might have right before the event.

“There is still a long way to go but I am just really excited for the opportunity to represent my country at the biggest sporting event in the world!” Brown mentioned excitedly.

The role that the KZN Department of Sport and Recreation, the Elite Athlete Development Programme as well as coach Graham Hill have played in getting Brown to the position he is in is not lost on the 24-year-old as he realises the enormity of his achievement.

“I don’t think what has happened would have been possible without the help of the EADP and Prime as well as my coach.

“They have all played a vital role in getting me to where I am today, whether it be through the gym or in the pool, and I am hugely grateful.

 

“The way in which the team at Prime help me in my recovery, as well as my preparation for events, is invaluable, without them I wouldn’t be doing what I am doing and doing it well,” said Brown.

For more information visit www.eapd.co.za - Supplied.


HUGE DREAMS FOR A HUGE TALENT

Jarred Crous would one day like to be the best in the world like Cameron van der Burgh has been for so many years.

The teenage breaststroker made the first step towards realising his dream when he qualified for the Rio Olympic Games at last week’s South African Swimming Championships in Durban.

Finishing behind Van der Burgh in the 200m breaststroke, the 19-year-old Crous posted a time of 2:11.65 to take four seconds off his previous best time to earn a place to his maiden Games.

”Now the hard work really begins to ensure I can actually compete and not just participate at the Olympics because you want to compete against the best in the world,” Crous said.

”The goal is to become the best one day, so I will have to start working on that now.”The former Crawford College pupil represented South Africa at the 2014 Nanjing Youth Olympics where he featured in the finals of the 50, 100, and 200m breaststroke.

Crous’ reason for getting into the pool is the same as Van der Burgh’s as their diagnoses for ADHD led them to swimming as an alternative treatment to medication.

They also matriculated from the same school, and will both be swimming the same events in Rio de Janeiro in August. While Van der Burgh will be going into the Games as the defending champion in the 100m breaststroke and as a serious medal prospect, Crous will be using his debut on the global stage as a stepping stone to future glory.

”The build-up to 2016 started last year September when I moved to Igor Omelchenko, and he said ‘we can make it if we put in all the effort’ but he couldn’t guarantee it, no-one can,” Crous said.

”It is going to be building blocks towards 2020 and 2024 going to my first major international gala and you can’t go much bigger than the Olympic Games.”This one will be more about getting the experience, taking in the vibe, and trying to make semi-finals and do personal best times while I am there.

”Crous’ qualifying swim provided one of the most poignant moments of last week’s championships as his father Juan Crous celebrated his son’s feat.

”You f…king champion!” Juan exclaimed as he hugged his son before they shared in an emotional embrace. Qualifying for the pinnacle of his sport, Crous talked about the personal sacrifices his parents had to make to aid him in reaching his dreams.

”When I won my first gold in 2005 my dad asked me what I wanted to do from there and I said I wanted to swim at the Olympics one day,” Crous recalled.

”My parents promised to do anything in their powers to get me there and they’ve done pretty much everything for me, the sacrifices have been huge, when we had no money they would support me no matter what.”

Source: IOL